TRELLIAN.COM Parent Of Above.com Acquires Drop Catch Platform DomainShield.Com.au

Trellian has announced its further expansion into the .AU drop catch business with the acquisition of the highly successful drop catch platform DomainShield.com.au.

Having only a handful of auDA accredited registrars that are authorized to drop catch, the acquisition further strengthens Trellian’s February 2017 acquisition of Drop.com.au drop catch platform and registrar.

The two drop catching operations will gradually be consolidated under the Drop.com.au brand, taking the best parts from each platform, plus many other functions from the existing Above.com Domain Portfolio Manager and Marketplace.

David Warmuz, CEO of Trellian stated: “After our drop.com.au acquisition we quickly realized that there was one key component missing: .au drop catch know how. We could learn and fine tune, but this would take months/years. Or we could partner with someone that obviously has the missing piece. So having someone like Anthony on board just made sense. I am eager to see what the future holds and I look forward to working with Anthony on reviving the drop.com.au drop catch platform.”

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/2kYNZyv

FASHION BRAND JIGSAW PRAISES IMMIGRATION IN BREXIT-DIVIDED BRITAIN

British fashion brand Jigsaw is best-known as a favorite of upscale, posh customers like the Duchess of Cambridge. But in a country still deeply riven by Brexit, the brand is taking a strongly pro-diversity, pro-immigration stance in a new campaign that includes a takeover of London’s Oxford Circus tube station.

Jigsaw’s Autumn/Winter campaign features the tagline “Heart Immigration,” includes a “mainfesto” that points out how “British style isn’t 100 per cent British” and highlights how important immigration is to its business.

“As a clothing brand, we couldn’t do what we do if people weren’t free to move around,” an ad says. “Without immigration, we’d be selling potato sacks.”

The creative, by agency The Corner, also includes ethnically diverse models, photographed in a British manor house by Ben Rayner.

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/2gkmxGw

Bryan Roberts of Venrock on Seeing Problems as Opportunities

This interview with Bryan Roberts, a partner at Venrock, a venture capital firm, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.

Q. What were your early years like?

A. I was born in Manhattan, and we lived on the Upper East Side until I was about five. We moved after an incident when I was walking my bike to Central Park with my mom, and I got hit by a taxi.

I was fine, but the bike was a bit mangled. I have this memory of looking up at a fender. Soon after, my mom said, “We’re out of here.”

We moved to Alpine, N.J., just north of the George Washington Bridge. It was in the middle of 300 acres of woods, and there were about ten families or so that rented places around there. We were just a bunch of kids rambling around. 

I loved problem solving as a kid. That’s probably the thread through most of my life. How do you build this? How do I get from here to there? The actual content of the problem matters less than the need to puzzle through something.

Tell me more about your parents.

My dad is an infectious-disease doctor, and my mom is in theater. They’re the two most polar-opposite people in the universe. My mom’s broadly intelligent, and my dad is just deeply awesome at diagnosing diseases.

How have they influenced your leadership style?

The biggest thing is thinking about others more than yourself. In my line of work, if you put your company ahead of you, you’re going to do fine. And I try to always interact with people who put other people front and center, rather than themselves.

People who are self-directed generally gather accomplishments and accolades and are very happy to tell you about them. When people are company- or mission-directed, it manifests as humility, and they generally push credit off onto other people.

Read the full article here: http://nyti.ms/2l1KDLt

As the World Tweets, Social Media Chiefs Remain Tight-Lipped

If only Twitter, Facebook and Google could keep their stories straight.

They thrive by mining the private information of the billions of people who use them, many of whom are naïve about the value of what they are giving up with each post or click. But the companies are grudging at best when it comes to being open about themselves.

Their tendency to show more reserve than the people whom they have encouraged to offer up bits of personal data has been especially striking in recent days.

The Rose McGowan episode was a case in point. After the actress posted a series of tweets suggesting that entertainment and media executives had helped cover up allegations of sexual harassment and abuse against Harvey Weinstein, Twitter shut down her account. Soon after that, the hashtag #WomenBoycottTwitter started trending, and Twitter reactivated it. That was followed by an unsurprising apology, in which Twitter’s chief executive, Jack Dorsey, said there was a need to be more “transparent” in explaining how Twitter comes to such decisions.

Read the full article here: http://nyti.ms/2ypvEjH

50 Questions to Test True Data Science Knowledge

This was the subject of a popular discussion recently posted on Quora: 20 questions to detect a fake data scientist. We asked our own data scientist, and he came up with a very different set of questions: compare his answer (#1 below – 20 questions) with Quora replies (#2 and #3 below – 30 questions). Note that #2 focuses on statistics, and #3 on architecture. The link to the original Quora discussion is also provided in this article. Which questions would you add or remove?

Many other related interview questions and answers (data science, R, Python and so on) can be found here.

Answer from our data scientist (many of these questions are open questions):

  • What is the life cycle of a data science project?
  • How do you measure yield (over base line) resulting from a new or refined algorithm or architecture?
  • What is cross-validation? How to do it right?
  • Is it better to design robust or accurate algorithms?
  • Have you written production code? Prototyped an algorithm? Created a proof of concept?
  • What is the biggest data set you have worked with, in terms of training set size, and in terms of having your algorithm implemented in production mode to process billions of transactions per day / month / year?
  • Name a few famous API’s (for instance Google search). How would you create one?
  • How to efficiently scrape web data, or collect tons of tweets?
  • How to optimize algorithms (parallel processing and/or faster algorithm: provide examples for both)
  • Examples of NoSQL architecture?
  • How do you clean data?
  • How do you define / select metrics? Have you designed and used compound metrics?
  • Examples of bad and good visualizations?
  • Have you been involved – as an adviser or architect – in the design of dashboard or alarm systems?
  • How frequently an algorithm must be updated? What about lookup tables in real-time systems?
  • Provide examples of machine-to-machine communication.
  • Provide examples where you automated a repetitive analytical task.
  • How do you assess the statistical significance of an insight?
  • How to turn unstructured data into structured data?
  • How to very efficiently cluster 100 billion web pages, for instance with a tagging or indexing algorithm?
  • If you were interviewing a data scientist, what questions would you ask her?

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/1Wp2qUI

Citi-Costco partnership shows its strength in Costco’s earnings report

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In its most recent earnings call, Costco provided another update on the performance of its Citi Visa co-branded card for members, which officially launched in June 2016.

The card is doing well across metrics, and is one of the major gainers in Costco’s margins, which fell slightly overall year-over-year (YoY).

  • New users are growing steadily. In the past year, Citi has added roughly 1.8 million new accounts and 2.4 million new cards — a discrepancy that most likely arises from multiple cardholders on a given account. This includes 270,000 new cards in the past 17 weeks, and represents a slowdown from the initial launch of the card, but still indicates a healthy growth rate.
  • And spend is on the rise. Costco reported that spending on the card is up YoY, not just as a result of new account acquisitions, but also organically. These shifts are reflected in numbers that Citi reported earlier this year — Costco’s $103 billion through Q2 2017 helped increase Citi’s card sales by a third. CFO Richard Galanti also noted that this is a card people tend to keep top-of-wallet, and the spend is coming not just from within Costco, but also from out-of-store, which is helping to propel growth. 

The performance of Costco’s product is a testament to why bigger is better for credit cards. When Amex owned the Costco co-brand portfolio, it was strong, posting $80 billion in billed business in its last full year. But it’s doing even better, and seems to be growing more quickly, under Citi — which is of benefit to Costco. That’s likely in part due to the card’s strong rewards proposition — cash-back offerings go as high as 4% for standard purchases, which is higher than those under Amex, and the firm is also running other promotions, like additional rewards on travel and discounts on Samsung purchases, which can incentivize high spending. But it could also be due to Visa’s wide acceptance network, which beats out Amex in the US, and could make it easier for users to turn to the product more regularly. At a time when credit appetite is high and firms are working to attract and engage customers, the scaling success of the Costco portfolio could be a lesson in how subtle changes that simplify and incentivize usage could make a big difference.

Read the full article here: http://read.bi/2ikfoKC

72 Must-Have Features for E-Commerce Websites [Infographic]

by Laura Forer

Whether you’re just starting an e-commerce website or you’ve had yours up for a while and want to look at it with fresh eyes, today’s infographic by WebAlive offers a helpful guide. The website design and development company has put together a list of 72 features you may want to consider for your site.

Some, such as including a product title and description on a product page, are basics.

But others, such as including risk reducers on your homepage or explanations about product download formats on a digital product page, may give you some new ideas for helpful content to be added to your site.

The graphic breaks down websites into the most common types of pages: homepage (including header and footer), category page, product page, checkout/shopping cart/wishlist pages, and blog; it also has information on backend features and other considerations.

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/2gf0e57

The Actual Management of Content

MAJA MRSIC

Poorly designed content marketing campaigns can make even the most ambitious projects crumble.

Marketers get so caught up in managing different tools and systems for multi-channel campaign delivery that they fail to recognize the most important part of this marketing mission: strategy. 

Running a strategic content marketing campaign is essential for achieving business success. Period. It will change a Web professional’s fundamental approach to running a marketing campaign and help them stay focused on the ultimate goal.

What is the best way to run campaigns efficiently without much fuss? Here are a few tips to consider when managing the day to day:

1. Use a content marketing pyramid 

Creating content without a strategy is a dead-end street. By producing a huge amount of content without having a clear idea of how to deliver the message, marketers are entering a vicious circle that usually ends up in a failure.

Those suspicious that they are indeed lacking underlying strategy may want to consider implementing a solution such as the Curata Content Marketing Pyramid, a framework devised to help business writers develop a predictable stream of successful content and coordinate their marketing efforts.

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/2hOq4x4

2018 The American Marketing Association New York Nominations

2018 Nominations

Nominate

Details about the nomination process:

Nominees can come from any marketing discipline—they can be CMOs or Marketing Directors, work in advertising or branding or research agencies, be academics, journalists, or other marketing experts. The awards are reserved for current marketing practitioners. They must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner. Our primary focus is on, but not limited to, the U.S.

Achievements that will be recognized include:

  • Marketing that works: Innovations that have had dramatic impact on business results, e.g. dramatically grow sales
  • Raising marketing’s profile: Increasing the influence of marketing, e.g. getting a seat on the board, expanding marketing’s remit to include innovation and growth strategy
  • New marketing tools and approaches: e.g. pioneers of social media, inventors of new forms of marketing research/measurement
  • Innovation in developing other marketers: Both current and the next generation of marketers through education, inspiration, and specialist programs

Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/2xPv8vP

Astronomers just proved the incredible origin of nearly all gold, platinum, and silver in the universe

  • For the first time, astronomers have detected a neutron-star collision.
  • Gravitational waves heard by two detectors pinpointed the source to a galaxy 130 million light-years away.
  • The collision produced a radioactive “kilonova” that forged hundreds of Earths’ worth of platinum, gold, silver, and other atoms.
  • The discovery solves a longstanding mystery about the origins of heavy elements.

Platinum and gold are among the most precious substances on Earth, each fetching roughly $1,000 an ounce.

However, their allure may grow stronger — and weirder — thanks to a groundbreaking new finding about their violent, radioactive, and cosmic origins.

On Monday, scientists who won a Nobel Prize for their discovery of gravitational waves, or ripples in the fabric of space, announced the first detection of the collision of two neutron stars.

The team alerted astronomers all over the world to the event right after it happened, helping them point telescopes directly at the scene of the crash and record unprecedented observations of the aftermath in visible light, radio waves, X-rays, and gamma rays.

The Swope Telescope was one of several that recorded a neutron star merger’s kilonova. UC Santa Cruz/Carnegie Observatories

These images revealed a radioactive soup giving birth to unfathomable amounts of platinum, gold, and silver — not to mention elements like the iodine found in our bodies, the uranium in nuclear weapons, and the bismuth in Pepto-Bismol — while shooting those materials deep into space.

The two neutron stars most likely merged to form a black hole, though the tiny bit of neutron star that escaped — and formed new elements — could get recycled into planets like Earth where aliens may eventually dig up the metals as we have.

“The calculations we did suggest most of the matter that came out of this event was in a swirling disk around a black hole. Half of that matter fell in, and half of it got ejected,” Brian Metzger, an astrophysicist at Columbia University who’s one of roughly 4,000 researchers involved in the discovery, told Business Insider. “The matter that ended up in your wedding band could have just as well fallen in.”

Read the full article here: http://read.bi/2gfph7V